Lead pouring.

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Lead casting forks. Over Christmas I used the wax forks I created earlier in the term to create push moulds in sand that I could pour lead into. I like the aesthetics of these, the bubbles from the sand are interesting and the over spill of lead looks interesting. I am going to cut some to beaten them and leave others in their raw state.


Pop up forks.

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Laser cut fork pieces. I am going to join these using strings and fishing wire and springs to make them interactive. When the button is pressed the fork will become limp until released. I need to redesign parts of this to laser cut again as the holes for string are too close to the edges.


Imagine forks had thumbs.

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Wire forks, spot welded. I’m starting to look at forks as an extension of the hand, an add on to the body. Working in wire I am designing forks with thumbs, to anthropormorphise them. These would work well as an intervention in restaurants and with friends.


Metal forks.

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Plasma cut forks. I used sheet metal to create the basic shape without the prongs, I am going to make these using wires that will be spot welded on to the end of each fork. The quality of the cut left by the plasma cutter is unique, and the almost charred look is appealing. I could colour the metals using a flame. There’s still a lot I could do with these shapes. Bending them is something I know will happen.


Printing more substantial cutlery than the canteen has to offer.

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My second fork, I scaled this one up and printed with full support just to see what would happen as the printing of this was questioned. The fork printed perfectly, so I am going to develop more of a finish for the object.


CuLtlery.

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Wax fork manipulation, here are some initial wax casts created last week in the wax session. I like the rough quality to the pieces, they look nieve and child like in their making. I want to build form using the fork shape to create something abstract. This could be cast in bronze or scanned in 3D to create a new dimension to the work.


Printing cutlery.

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First 3D print!! After the usual issues with Rhino I managed to print a fork.. I drew the shape using a scanned image, created a surface and extruded it before using the bend and twist tools. I then took a 2D drawing of the object and further bent the form. The print only took about 20 minutes to complete. The forms that are printed can be built up to create a further abstract form.


Fork bending fun.

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Perspex laser cut fork that has been heated and manipulated. The process of this was quite simple, I drew the shape on rhino and then used the software linked to the laser cutter to finish the drawing ready for print. The machine to heat the perspex was simple, a low heat is better than heating instantly as the material bubbles. I like the finish on the fork, its such a simple piece. I’m hoping to use ardunio to make it more interactive and develop a way to progress my design.


Cooking up a fork.

Finally used my vinamould mould with beeswax. I haven’t had a wax induction yet so the making of this took place in the kitchen. I like the quality of the wax. Next I am going to soften the wax in hot water to manipulate the shape, I need to trim the edges first though.


Getting hot and sticky.

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Open access workshop using Vinamould, it works a bit like silicone. Here I have taken a mould of a fork which I plan to use to create multiple wax forks that can be bent and twisted. It fits in with my 3D design brief in which I plan to use mundane objects that I will manipulate using Rhino. It will be printed out using a makerbot and finished by hand. I’m currently developing my ideas for the project to be presented this Friday.